Natural landscapes: when the sunshine strikes

WINTER SUNRISE ON CASTLE MOUNTAIN, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

Besides the stunning light, the key to this picture is the dusting of snow on the trees. Without that, I probably wouldn’t have made this photo. The black-and-white processing puts the focus squarely on the dramatic light and shadows.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky, peak and distant trees.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

Rural landscapes: the cold sunset

TRYING TO STAY WARM NEAR COCHRANE, ALBERTA

Yes, it was cold. But as you can see, it was also so beautiful that it was worth freezing a little to photograph these horses, probably staying close to each other for the body heat.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: a walk in the forest

AMONG THE COTTONWOODS, GLENBOW RANCH PROVINCIAL PARK, NEAR COCHRANE, ALBERTA

There was almost something abstract about the lines of snowy cottonwoods. Add a winding path into it and the potential for a meaningful picture becomes obvious. I did one series of exposures with no one in it, then added me into the next series. It took four or five tries, with me running back and forth, to get me in the right spot. Then I kept me in colour and transformed the rest of the scene into black-and-white to make the overall composition more memorable (I hope). I’ve tried this Photoshop technique before. You can see it here: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-v6
Nikon D7100, tripod.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the river sunrise

SUNRISE ON THE BOW RIVER, CALGARY, ALBERTA

While cars, trucks and tractor trailers roared past just 10 feet behind me, I patiently waited for the best possible light and reflection. I kept hoping the dark top clouds would be illuminated, but no luck. (You can see a horizontal version of this loooong exposure here: http://bit.ly/NovemberSunrise)
Nikon D7100, tripod, enhancing filter, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the curves of water

WINTER ON THE PETAWAWA RIVER, ONTARIO

I turned this scene into an abstract interpretation by using a long exposure to make the water silky, then converting the jpeg into black-and-white.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: the craggy peaks

CASTLE MOUNTAIN CLOSEUP, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

Castle Mountain is one of the most iconic and photographed peaks in the Canadian Rockies. When you see it as I did, with the first glow of golden sunrise light, it’s not hard to understand why. (Here’s another view during a glorious winter sunrise: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-h7.)
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

Urban landscapes: the soaring ceiling II

ST. DUNSTAN’S BASILICA, CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

I had trouble believing a town as small as Charlottetown (population: 35,000) could have a stunning cathedral. Then I walked inside this Roman Catholic basilica and was absolutely blown away. Spent 45 minutes wandering around with my tripod, making long exposures with no one to stop me. What a blessing.  🙂
Nikon D7100, tripod

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: the glittering winter lake

LAKE LOUISE AND VICTORIA GLACIER, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

This is one of the most photographed lakes in Canada, but it still beckons photographers to try and find a view that’s not a cliche. In this instance, the peak on the left border is balanced by the trees on the right border; they serve as a frame for everything in between.
Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

Natural landscapes: the November forest

AFTER THE LEAVES HAVE FALLEN, VICTORIA PARK, CHARLOTTETOWN, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

On the same day and in same park where I found this autumn colour (https://wp.me/p2ccTX-ZR), I walked through the crunchy leaves in a somber atmosphere. The dark foreground tree trunks initially grabbed my attention, then I worked to make the surrounding scenery just as compelling.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: when the winter wind blows

BLOWING SNOW AT ABRAHAM LAKE, ALBERTA

It’s windy and unbelievably slippery. But Abraham Lake, a man-made creation in the Canadian Rockies, is a mecca for photographers because of the amazing ice and the even more amazing methane-caused ice bubbles (here’s what those ice bubbles look like: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-tY). The only way to get around on the ice is to wear crampons; otherwise, you’re falling flat on your butt more times than you care to admit. Yes, that was me before I got crampons.  🙂

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

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