Urban landscapes: the soaring skyscraper

JAMES FLAHERTY BUILDING, OTTAWA, ONTARIO

This 17-storey structure, completed in 2014 just a few blocks from the Canadian Parliament buildings, is named after a former national minister of finance. Flaherty served for eight years before unexpectedly dying just a few weeks after resigning in 2014. The building is occupied by 2,600 federal government employees.
I was attracted by the bold exterior and the bright night-time lighting, working carefully to make everything as symmetrical as possible. There wasn’t much colour in this scene, so I went with a black-and-white treatment to emphasize the lines.
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Urban landscapes: the stunning sunrise

A HOLE IN THE CLOUDS, CALGARY, ALBERTA

The day was supposed to be cloudy, but I was itching to make some pictures, so I ventured out anyway. This was my reward — 20 minutes of amaaaaaaazing dawn light striking the skyline of this western Canadian city.
See the tower under construction? That’s Telus Sky and it’s the reason I avoid photographing skylines when something major is being built. After all, as soon as the structure is finished, any pictures I’ve made would be instantly dated. But how could I say no to capturing this glorious spring light?
Nikon D7100, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky and buildings.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Urban landscapes: the bridge and the moon

SETTING MOON OVER BELLEVILLE BAY BRIDGE, ONTARIO

This bridge connects Belleville, Ontario with Prince Edward Country, a charming rural area that thrusts out into Lake Ontario east of Toronto (Canada’s largest city). I was blessed to be here on a picturesque spring dawn, capturing the moon before it sank below the horizon.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my coffeetable photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

Urban landscapes: the yellow poles

TORONTO OFFICE BUILDING

I passed this building often when visiting Toronto and always wanted to see if those yellow posts could translate into a compelling photo. Finally, I spent an hour there one afternoon trying all kinds of compositions. This is one of the best and I decided to highlight the yellow by turning the rest of the photo into black-and-white. Here’s the full colour version: http://bit.ly/TorontoBuilding.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Light and Lines: An Urban Landscape Portfolio”: http://bit.ly/LIGHTandLINES

Rural landscapes: capturing the spring wind

McBRIDE LAKE WIND FARM, SOUTHERN ALBERTA

I know there are people who deeply dislike wind turbines, but I find them to be fascinating photo subjects. And there are hundreds of them in the deep south of this western Canada province, which is known as one of the windiest places in the country.
I went for a black-and-white treatment of this scene, simply because it’s more dramatic than the colour version. This ‘farm’ alone has 114 turbines, which (according to co-owner TransAlta) produces 235,000 megawatt hours of electricity annually.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: the brooding spring dawn

CLOUDY MORNING ON THE BAY OF QUINTE, BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO

The renewed growth of spring was barely underway when I visited this part of Belleville, a city of 50,000 east of Toronto (Canada’s largest city). I appreciated the moody atmosphere and decided to emphasize it to make more of a creative statement.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/11kOiRk

Rural landscapes: before the colour arrives

EARLY SPRING IN THE FOOTHILLS NEAR CALGARY, ALBERTA

At this elevation (1,000 metres above sea level), spring tends to arrive a little later. That means we deal with a few more weeks of brown fields. But it all looks pretty good with a white fence and golden evening light.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the spring peaks

SPRING IN THE CANADIAN ROCKIES

I captured this view, in exquisite lighting, from my airplane window a few years ago. It’s amazing how the Rockies can look like January even as the rest of Alberta and British Columbia are well into the renewal of spring. Nikon D7100

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

Natural landscapes: the beauty of spring breakup

MELTING SNOW ALONG THE BOW RIVER, GLENBOW RANCH PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA

I had a few joyous hours of photography along this western Canadian river, capturing many scenes like this in beautifully warm evening light. Winter can last a long time this far north and at such a high altitude (1,000 metres above sea level). But it’s still sweet when it arrives.
Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the last gasp of winter

LATE WINTER SNOW ON THE BADLANDS, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

Many people have rarely seen photos of Canada’s badlands, so I can’t resist showing you these badlands with snow. I like the play of brown soil and snow and the subtle sense that you can walk around the tall hill and see what’s behind. I darkened the sky to ensure a strong contrast with the ground and also to subtly push your eyes back into the photo. (Here’s another badlands view, right after a snow storm: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-td.)
Niko n D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

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