Natural landscapes: the last gasp of winter

LATE WINTER SNOW ON THE BADLANDS, DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

Many people have rarely seen photos of Canada’s badlands, so I can’t resist showing you these badlands with snow. I like the play of brown soil and snow and the subtle sense that you can walk around the tall hill and see what’s behind. I darkened the sky to ensure a strong contrast with the ground and also to subtly push your eyes back into the photo. (Here’s another badlands view, right after a snow storm: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-td.)
Niko n D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Rural landscapes: the glow of spring frost

FROSTY LANDSCAPE NEAR BRAGG CREEK, ALBERTA

It was one of those days when I had to work hard to NOT make great photos of this transformed western Canadian landscape. This charming road was just north of the Trans Canada Highway; while traffic roared past on that route, I didn’t see a single vehicle during my time on this dirt trail.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Rural landscapes: amidst the March fog

SIGNAL HILL, ST. JOHN’S NEWFOUNDLAND

One of the most iconic places in this east-coast Canadian province was shrouded in fog when I visited. I didn’t mind; I knew anything I photographed here would be laden with atmosphere and I was right.
The misty structure is Cabot Tower, which opened in 1900. It was built to commemorate Queen Elizabeth’s diamond jubilee and the 400th anniversary of John Cabot’s North American landfall in 1497. Behind this view, on clear days, is a glorious vista of St. John’s.
Nikon D7100, tripod, graduated density (darkening) filter on the sky.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Rural landscapes: the near & far view

BARN AND OLD TRUCK, NEAR DRUMHELLER, ALBERTA

It was -25c when I spotted this old truck along the road and realized it would make a compelling photo when contrasted with the newer, maintained barn in the distant background. The key was going with a shallow depth of field so the barn would be just enough out-of-focus that it would complement, rather than compete with the truck for your primary attention. Here’s the colour version: http://bit.ly/TruckAndBarn.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4A

Natural landscapes: the roadside waterfall

TUMBLING DOWN THE HILL, TORBAY, NEWFOUNDLAND

I was traveling to a work meeting when I encountered this beautiful little waterfall, surrounded by icy snow, on a hillside beside the road.
Fortunately, I was early for the interview so there was time to stop, haul out the photography equipment and make long exposures like this.
There are waterfalls, big and small, all over the province’s Avalon Peninsula (here’s another one in the same town: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-1dm).
What a blessing to find this one, which I processed black-and-white because the scene had so little colour.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: the winter wave

CRESTING WATER OFF THE COAST OF CAPE SPEAR, NEWFOUNDLAND

As I processed this jpeg with Photoshop, I debated whether to crop off some of the left side – after all, some might see the current composition as being weighed to the right. But then I decided to keep it because the cresting wave is rolling to the left, so there’s space for it to fall and space for your mind to consider what the water will look like just a second or two after this exposure was made.
I love the drama of black-and-white, but some might like colour better, so here it is: http://bit.ly/WinterWave
Nikon D7100, tripod, 70-300 mm. zoom lens.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Natural landscapes: epic winter!

SHADOWS AND SNOW, BANFF NATIONAL PARK, ALBERTA

I was a long way from this small section of mountain in the Canadian Rockies. But a decent telephoto lens let me show you a close-up view of raw, spectacular winter. The colour version is good (you can see it here: http://bit.ly/BanffWinterShadow), but to my eyes this monotone version has more drama.
Nikon D7100, tripod, 70-300 mm. lens

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book “BLUE SYMPHONY: Winter in the Canadian Rockies”: http://bit.ly/kFb3Xw

 

Natural landscapes: the curve of the water

PETAWAWA RIVER AND FROSTY TREES, PETAWAWA, ONTARIO

I found this spot before dawn on a cold, cold day. The lack of light made a long exposure possible, giving you a nice feel for the sweep of the water. This river flows from Algonquin Park east to the Ottawa River. It’s name, in the Algonquin language, means “where one hears a noise like this” – referring to river’s many photogenic rapids. Here’s an artistic take on those rapids: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-10p
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Urban landscapes: where the ladies gathered

LADIES CHAPEL, ST. PATRICK’S CATHEDRAL, DUBLIN

This glorious cathedral was an unexpected gift because I was allowed to use my tripod. That meant taking all the time needed to carefully compose scenes like this and making long exposures to preserve the sweet, subtle lighting.
What you’re seeing here isn’t the main part of this 800-year-old cathedral. You can see that here: https://wp.me/p2ccTX-UI
Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “IRELAND: Visions of Light”: http://bit.ly/IrelandVisionsOfLight

Natural landscapes: me and the winter river

WINTER ON THE PETAWAWA RIVER, ONTARIO

As you can tell, it was a c-c-cold morning when I pushed through the snow to find this viewpoint in the Canadian military town of Petawawa. This Canadian Shield river stays mostly open even in the most frigid temperatures, often creating a fog that makes good photos even better.
Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter

Click on the picture for a larger view.

Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Wander through my coffeetable photography book “Special Places: A Landscape Photographer’s Vision of Southern Ontario”: http://bit.ly/yNU06F

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